All posts by brianlaesch@gmail.com

I grew up in Bloomington, IL.

Mark Laesch Award Recipients Announced

For Immediate Release

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Mark Laesch Award Recipients Announced

NORMAN, Okla. – The Golf Coaches Association of America (GCAA) and Women’s Golf Coaches Association (WGCA) have announced the recipients for the first annual Mark Laesch Awards. Teams were recognized based on improvement in adjusted stroke average per individual per round from the 2015-16 to 2016-17 seasons (denoted in parenthesis below).

WGCA recipients included LIU Brooklyn (6.7) in Division I, Division II’s Regis (6.42), and Transylvania (10.15) from Division III.

For the GCAA honorees were North Dakota State (2.29) from Division I, Division II’s Saginaw Valley State (3.51), Division III’s Rosemont College (24.07), Corban (12.72) of NAIA, Dodge City CC (0.99) from NJCAA Division I, and NJCAA Division II’s Southeast CC (4.40).

 

– GCAA/WGCA –

 

WGCA:

The Women’s Golf Coaches Association, founded in 1983, is a non-profit organization representing women’s collegiate golf coaches. The WGCA was formed to encourage the playing of college golf for women in correlation with a general objective of education and in accordance with the highest tradition of intercollegiate competition. Today, the WGCA represents nearly 600 coaches throughout the U.S. and is dedicated to educating, promoting and recognizing both its members and the student-athletes they represent.

GCAA:

Established in 1958, the Golf Coaches Association of America (GCAA) is the professional organization of golf coaches. The GCAA’s mission is to support its member coaches by creating educational opportunities, providing resources, and promoting its members with the purpose of enhancing their overall performance as coaches, mentors, and teachers. The GCAA also recognizes the excellence and achievements of its members and their student-athletes in academic, athletic and civic endeavors.

The ALS Association Chicago office is right across the street

As you may or may not know, my dad passed from ALS in March.  I was there.  In fact, my siblings were all there that day, which was interesting since it was the first time we were all together since Christmas.  I kept thinking to myself that day, this all seems too perfect.  And, well, sadly, it was.  But I’m glad we all got to spend time with him that day.  I miss him very much but I’m glad he’s no longer suffering.  I was going back and thinking about all the things that have happened this past year or so.  I’ve also just been thinking about ALS, in general.

For those of you who don’t know, ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), or Lou Gherig’s disease, is a devastating disease that progressively takes away the ability to use your muscles. You lose your ability to walk, use your arms and ultimately breathe. It’s a death sentence.  I’ve watched my Grandpa (when I was 5) and my dad now go through it.  It’s not typically genetic, but is in a small percentage of cases.  My Grandpa’s brother also passed from the disease.  My dad’s sister also passed from the disease, this same year, months before my dad.  I was glad I had the chance to drive him to the funeral, despite how sad it was.

ALS has been around for a while, and there is still no cure.  It was first found in 1869, it came to national prominence in the US when Lou Gherig was diagnosed in 1939, and again during the ice bucket challenge around the summer of 2014.  About 6,000 American are diagnosed every year, which is why it doesn’t get the coverage of other diseases, but if you or a loved one have been through it, you understand just how horrible it is.  It was also featured in the documentary Gleason, about former New Orleans Saints player Steve Gleason who was diagnosed who was diagnosed in 2011.  Another strange note: I saw this movie at the Sundance Film Festival in 2016 just a couple months before my dad was diagnosed.  I was the only one from my group who made it to that screening.  It actually helped prepare me for what I would go through with my dad just a few months later.

There has been progression in treatment and medication, but no cure, after all this time.  I realize there are plenty of things to spend your money on.  Plenty of charities out there.  But if you’ve seen what ALS can do to a loved one, I urge you to join the cause.  It’s devastating.  I was devastated, and still am.  But as a good friend of my dad’s told me at his funeral, “one foot after the other.”  I had no doubt that’s what I would do, because I’m my dad’s son.

Oh, by the way, I moved to Chicago because I had an opportunity to do so in December, which also allowed me to be 3 hours from my dad which I used to my advantage to see him a lot over the past year and help as much as I could.  He never got to see the place, unfortunately, but as I picked up some of his stuff and drove it up to my place in his van for 24 hours the week of his funeral to recharge and pick up my suit, I felt he was with me.  I felt he finally saw the place.  Months after I moved in, and after my dad passed, I looked up the ALS Association Chicago who I had exchanged some emails with as I signed up for the Walk to Defeat ALS.  I was shocked to find out that their office was literally right across the street from my building.  What are the chances, right?

Use Charity Miles to raise money for ALS, other charities

I ran some miles today using Charity Miles to raise money for the The ALS Association as sponsored by Johnson & Johnson (today). I encourage you to do the same for The ALS Association, or another charity. All you have to do is turn it on, select a charity, create a profile and select walk, run or bike. (Note: I haven’t read the fine print. I don’t know how much actually goes to the charity, but I’m going to be doing these things anyway, so I’m running with it.) Also, use smile.amazon.com. Also, Happy Sunday, enjoy life and God bless.

Report from NBA Summer League

Here’s my report on Lonzo Ball after seeing him get a triple-double in person in a 94-83 win over the Cleveland Cavaliers. His shot is really bad and they are going to have to reconstruct it to make him a shooter in the league. But he’s a really smart player.  He get’s it done on offense and defense, and in all statistical categories.  He’s a team player, and the comparisons to Jason Kidd are spot on. He’s going to be the next Jason Kidd and a good one. As long as he’s more of a distributor than a shooter. Even Jason Kidd made himself into a decent shooter and Ball is ahead of Kidd there, in my opinion.

Also, in the MavericksKings game before, Dennis Smith Jr. had a missed dunk that would have brought the house down, and still basically did.  Should be a stud for the Mavericks in his rookie year.

 

Brian Laesch is an “independent” Chicago Bulls beat writer waiting out the rebuilding process.

Next Starts Now: SuiteWorld17 Executive Keynote feat. Jim McGeever

Here’s the NetSuite SuiteWorld17 Opening Keynote with Jim McGeever. It also features some insights into the acquisition and plan for NetSuite moving forward from Oracle CEO Mark Hurd. As a Certified NetSuite ERP Consultant, I’m excited about continued growth of NetSuite, and what Oracle can provide in fostering that growth. Personally, as in line with everything you see below, I consider it an exciting time to be a part of NetSuite as an employee, partner or customer.

Although, I’ll be honest. I think NetSuite/Oracle really missed a great opportunity to have one of their own PS Consultants rap in the opening.

You can watch other SuiteWorld17 videos here, courtesy of the SuiteWorld17 playlist on NetSuite’s YouTube channel.

HR Note: Any NetSuite posts from me are from a completely evangelical perspective and offer no internal insight or IP risk.

Golfweek honors my Dad

My dad, Mark Laesch, is battling ALS.  He was diagnosed earlier this year.  Golfweek captured, very well, how his positive attitude, determination and faith have driven him through this tough battle.  I’ve witnessed it first hand, and it has been incredible. I’m very proud of my dad. I’m very proud of everything his done with Golfstat and everything he has done in life. He has always been a man that does not cut corners. He does things right and he works hard.  He lives by a strong moral code, guided by his faith and upbringing. I am and will always be very proud to call him my dad.

Please check out Golfweek‘s article below. Can’t thank Golfweek enough for putting this together:

Golfstat founder Mark Laesch stays positive as his time runs out

Mark Laesch

Oracle deal to acquire NetSuite is going through

It finally went through. Oracle is set to complete the $9.3 billion deal to buy NetSuite.  Here we go.

Some other articles about the acquisition: